Meta: Snowpiercer

elucipher:

My [scattered] thoughts on Bong Joon-ho’s Snowpiercer. This was originally just a defence of the film’s ending—which I’ve seen widely criticised—because I think it’s brilliant and necessary and worth defending. But… then there’s everything else.

[major spoilers, of course]

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goodmorningleftside:

afro-art-chick:

Women of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, 1969.

Off the pigs!

foresity:


Firefly || Tsuneaki Hiramatsu
foresity:


Firefly || Tsuneaki Hiramatsu
foresity:


Firefly || Tsuneaki Hiramatsu
foresity:


Firefly || Tsuneaki Hiramatsu
foresity:


Firefly || Tsuneaki Hiramatsu
foresity:


Firefly || Tsuneaki Hiramatsu
foresity:


Firefly || Tsuneaki Hiramatsu
asylum-art:

Lupita Nyong’o's First Vogue Cover, photographed by Mikael Jansson, July 2014
In a very short time, the luminous and talented Lupita Nyong’o has become a fashion icon – dazzling the red carpet last winter in bright, bold, daring fashions as she gathered up most of the awards for her role in 12 Years a Slave. Now she’s a staple at fashion events, as well as the new face of Lancôme. In addition to her heartbreaking, breakthrough performance and her cool sense of style and confidence, she has also delighted film and fashion fans alike with her brightness and intelligence. Hamish Bowles interviews Lupita for the July issue of Vogue, and Mikael Jansson photographs Lupita in various locales in Marrakech as she effortlessly models pieces by powerhouse designers like Ricardo Tisci for Givenchy, Rodarte, and Proenza Schouler.
asylum-art:

Lupita Nyong’o's First Vogue Cover, photographed by Mikael Jansson, July 2014
In a very short time, the luminous and talented Lupita Nyong’o has become a fashion icon – dazzling the red carpet last winter in bright, bold, daring fashions as she gathered up most of the awards for her role in 12 Years a Slave. Now she’s a staple at fashion events, as well as the new face of Lancôme. In addition to her heartbreaking, breakthrough performance and her cool sense of style and confidence, she has also delighted film and fashion fans alike with her brightness and intelligence. Hamish Bowles interviews Lupita for the July issue of Vogue, and Mikael Jansson photographs Lupita in various locales in Marrakech as she effortlessly models pieces by powerhouse designers like Ricardo Tisci for Givenchy, Rodarte, and Proenza Schouler.
asylum-art:

Lupita Nyong’o's First Vogue Cover, photographed by Mikael Jansson, July 2014
In a very short time, the luminous and talented Lupita Nyong’o has become a fashion icon – dazzling the red carpet last winter in bright, bold, daring fashions as she gathered up most of the awards for her role in 12 Years a Slave. Now she’s a staple at fashion events, as well as the new face of Lancôme. In addition to her heartbreaking, breakthrough performance and her cool sense of style and confidence, she has also delighted film and fashion fans alike with her brightness and intelligence. Hamish Bowles interviews Lupita for the July issue of Vogue, and Mikael Jansson photographs Lupita in various locales in Marrakech as she effortlessly models pieces by powerhouse designers like Ricardo Tisci for Givenchy, Rodarte, and Proenza Schouler.
asylum-art:

Lupita Nyong’o's First Vogue Cover, photographed by Mikael Jansson, July 2014
In a very short time, the luminous and talented Lupita Nyong’o has become a fashion icon – dazzling the red carpet last winter in bright, bold, daring fashions as she gathered up most of the awards for her role in 12 Years a Slave. Now she’s a staple at fashion events, as well as the new face of Lancôme. In addition to her heartbreaking, breakthrough performance and her cool sense of style and confidence, she has also delighted film and fashion fans alike with her brightness and intelligence. Hamish Bowles interviews Lupita for the July issue of Vogue, and Mikael Jansson photographs Lupita in various locales in Marrakech as she effortlessly models pieces by powerhouse designers like Ricardo Tisci for Givenchy, Rodarte, and Proenza Schouler.
asylum-art:

Lupita Nyong’o's First Vogue Cover, photographed by Mikael Jansson, July 2014
In a very short time, the luminous and talented Lupita Nyong’o has become a fashion icon – dazzling the red carpet last winter in bright, bold, daring fashions as she gathered up most of the awards for her role in 12 Years a Slave. Now she’s a staple at fashion events, as well as the new face of Lancôme. In addition to her heartbreaking, breakthrough performance and her cool sense of style and confidence, she has also delighted film and fashion fans alike with her brightness and intelligence. Hamish Bowles interviews Lupita for the July issue of Vogue, and Mikael Jansson photographs Lupita in various locales in Marrakech as she effortlessly models pieces by powerhouse designers like Ricardo Tisci for Givenchy, Rodarte, and Proenza Schouler.
asylum-art:

Lupita Nyong’o's First Vogue Cover, photographed by Mikael Jansson, July 2014
In a very short time, the luminous and talented Lupita Nyong’o has become a fashion icon – dazzling the red carpet last winter in bright, bold, daring fashions as she gathered up most of the awards for her role in 12 Years a Slave. Now she’s a staple at fashion events, as well as the new face of Lancôme. In addition to her heartbreaking, breakthrough performance and her cool sense of style and confidence, she has also delighted film and fashion fans alike with her brightness and intelligence. Hamish Bowles interviews Lupita for the July issue of Vogue, and Mikael Jansson photographs Lupita in various locales in Marrakech as she effortlessly models pieces by powerhouse designers like Ricardo Tisci for Givenchy, Rodarte, and Proenza Schouler.
asylum-art:

Lupita Nyong’o's First Vogue Cover, photographed by Mikael Jansson, July 2014
In a very short time, the luminous and talented Lupita Nyong’o has become a fashion icon – dazzling the red carpet last winter in bright, bold, daring fashions as she gathered up most of the awards for her role in 12 Years a Slave. Now she’s a staple at fashion events, as well as the new face of Lancôme. In addition to her heartbreaking, breakthrough performance and her cool sense of style and confidence, she has also delighted film and fashion fans alike with her brightness and intelligence. Hamish Bowles interviews Lupita for the July issue of Vogue, and Mikael Jansson photographs Lupita in various locales in Marrakech as she effortlessly models pieces by powerhouse designers like Ricardo Tisci for Givenchy, Rodarte, and Proenza Schouler.
asylum-art:

Lupita Nyong’o's First Vogue Cover, photographed by Mikael Jansson, July 2014
In a very short time, the luminous and talented Lupita Nyong’o has become a fashion icon – dazzling the red carpet last winter in bright, bold, daring fashions as she gathered up most of the awards for her role in 12 Years a Slave. Now she’s a staple at fashion events, as well as the new face of Lancôme. In addition to her heartbreaking, breakthrough performance and her cool sense of style and confidence, she has also delighted film and fashion fans alike with her brightness and intelligence. Hamish Bowles interviews Lupita for the July issue of Vogue, and Mikael Jansson photographs Lupita in various locales in Marrakech as she effortlessly models pieces by powerhouse designers like Ricardo Tisci for Givenchy, Rodarte, and Proenza Schouler.
asylum-art:

Lupita Nyong’o's First Vogue Cover, photographed by Mikael Jansson, July 2014
In a very short time, the luminous and talented Lupita Nyong’o has become a fashion icon – dazzling the red carpet last winter in bright, bold, daring fashions as she gathered up most of the awards for her role in 12 Years a Slave. Now she’s a staple at fashion events, as well as the new face of Lancôme. In addition to her heartbreaking, breakthrough performance and her cool sense of style and confidence, she has also delighted film and fashion fans alike with her brightness and intelligence. Hamish Bowles interviews Lupita for the July issue of Vogue, and Mikael Jansson photographs Lupita in various locales in Marrakech as she effortlessly models pieces by powerhouse designers like Ricardo Tisci for Givenchy, Rodarte, and Proenza Schouler.

asylum-art:

Lupita Nyong’o's First Vogue Cover, photographed by Mikael Jansson, July 2014

In a very short time, the luminous and talented Lupita Nyong’o has become a fashion icon – dazzling the red carpet last winter in bright, bold, daring fashions as she gathered up most of the awards for her role in 12 Years a Slave. Now she’s a staple at fashion events, as well as the new face of Lancôme. In addition to her heartbreaking, breakthrough performance and her cool sense of style and confidence, she has also delighted film and fashion fans alike with her brightness and intelligence. Hamish Bowles interviews Lupita for the July issue of Vogue, and Mikael Jansson photographs Lupita in various locales in Marrakech as she effortlessly models pieces by powerhouse designers like Ricardo Tisci for Givenchy, Rodarte, and Proenza Schouler.

(via generation-desenchantee)


Paul Delaroche - The Young Martyr (1855)

Paul Delaroche - The Young Martyr (1855)

Paul Delaroche - The Young Martyr (1855)

(via cementerio)

nevver:

Guy Bordain nevver:

Guy Bordain nevver:

Guy Bordain nevver:

Guy Bordain
ryanpanos:

Tower of David: the World’s Tallest Slum | Via
The Tower of David is an abandoned unfinished skyscraper in the center of Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela, that is now home to more than 3,000 squatters, who have turned the 45-story skyscraper into the world’s tallest slum.
Construction of the building, originally called “Centro Financiero Confinanzas” and nicknamed the “Tower of David”, after its developer, David Brillembourg, was started in 1990 and was to become a symbol of Caracas’ bright financial future. It is the third highest skyscraper in the country. But a banking crisis brought those plans to an abrupt halt in 1994. The government took control over the building and construction was never completed. The building has no elevators, no installed electricity or running water, no balcony railing and windows and even walls in many places.
In 2007, a group of squatters took over the building, and it quickly gained notoriety as a hotbed of crime and drugs. Despite this, residents have managed to build a comfortable and self sustaining community complete with basic utility services such as electricity and water that reaches all the way up to the 22nd floor. Lifts being absent, residents can use motorcycles to travel up and down the first 10 floors, but must use the stairs for the remaining levels.  Inside the building’s long hallways there are warehouses, clothing stores, beauty parlours, a dentist and day-care centers. Some residents even have cars, parked inside of the building’s parking garage. Some seven hundred families comprising over 3,000 residents live in the tower today.
ryanpanos:

Tower of David: the World’s Tallest Slum | Via
The Tower of David is an abandoned unfinished skyscraper in the center of Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela, that is now home to more than 3,000 squatters, who have turned the 45-story skyscraper into the world’s tallest slum.
Construction of the building, originally called “Centro Financiero Confinanzas” and nicknamed the “Tower of David”, after its developer, David Brillembourg, was started in 1990 and was to become a symbol of Caracas’ bright financial future. It is the third highest skyscraper in the country. But a banking crisis brought those plans to an abrupt halt in 1994. The government took control over the building and construction was never completed. The building has no elevators, no installed electricity or running water, no balcony railing and windows and even walls in many places.
In 2007, a group of squatters took over the building, and it quickly gained notoriety as a hotbed of crime and drugs. Despite this, residents have managed to build a comfortable and self sustaining community complete with basic utility services such as electricity and water that reaches all the way up to the 22nd floor. Lifts being absent, residents can use motorcycles to travel up and down the first 10 floors, but must use the stairs for the remaining levels.  Inside the building’s long hallways there are warehouses, clothing stores, beauty parlours, a dentist and day-care centers. Some residents even have cars, parked inside of the building’s parking garage. Some seven hundred families comprising over 3,000 residents live in the tower today.
ryanpanos:

Tower of David: the World’s Tallest Slum | Via
The Tower of David is an abandoned unfinished skyscraper in the center of Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela, that is now home to more than 3,000 squatters, who have turned the 45-story skyscraper into the world’s tallest slum.
Construction of the building, originally called “Centro Financiero Confinanzas” and nicknamed the “Tower of David”, after its developer, David Brillembourg, was started in 1990 and was to become a symbol of Caracas’ bright financial future. It is the third highest skyscraper in the country. But a banking crisis brought those plans to an abrupt halt in 1994. The government took control over the building and construction was never completed. The building has no elevators, no installed electricity or running water, no balcony railing and windows and even walls in many places.
In 2007, a group of squatters took over the building, and it quickly gained notoriety as a hotbed of crime and drugs. Despite this, residents have managed to build a comfortable and self sustaining community complete with basic utility services such as electricity and water that reaches all the way up to the 22nd floor. Lifts being absent, residents can use motorcycles to travel up and down the first 10 floors, but must use the stairs for the remaining levels.  Inside the building’s long hallways there are warehouses, clothing stores, beauty parlours, a dentist and day-care centers. Some residents even have cars, parked inside of the building’s parking garage. Some seven hundred families comprising over 3,000 residents live in the tower today.
ryanpanos:

Tower of David: the World’s Tallest Slum | Via
The Tower of David is an abandoned unfinished skyscraper in the center of Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela, that is now home to more than 3,000 squatters, who have turned the 45-story skyscraper into the world’s tallest slum.
Construction of the building, originally called “Centro Financiero Confinanzas” and nicknamed the “Tower of David”, after its developer, David Brillembourg, was started in 1990 and was to become a symbol of Caracas’ bright financial future. It is the third highest skyscraper in the country. But a banking crisis brought those plans to an abrupt halt in 1994. The government took control over the building and construction was never completed. The building has no elevators, no installed electricity or running water, no balcony railing and windows and even walls in many places.
In 2007, a group of squatters took over the building, and it quickly gained notoriety as a hotbed of crime and drugs. Despite this, residents have managed to build a comfortable and self sustaining community complete with basic utility services such as electricity and water that reaches all the way up to the 22nd floor. Lifts being absent, residents can use motorcycles to travel up and down the first 10 floors, but must use the stairs for the remaining levels.  Inside the building’s long hallways there are warehouses, clothing stores, beauty parlours, a dentist and day-care centers. Some residents even have cars, parked inside of the building’s parking garage. Some seven hundred families comprising over 3,000 residents live in the tower today.
ryanpanos:

Tower of David: the World’s Tallest Slum | Via
The Tower of David is an abandoned unfinished skyscraper in the center of Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela, that is now home to more than 3,000 squatters, who have turned the 45-story skyscraper into the world’s tallest slum.
Construction of the building, originally called “Centro Financiero Confinanzas” and nicknamed the “Tower of David”, after its developer, David Brillembourg, was started in 1990 and was to become a symbol of Caracas’ bright financial future. It is the third highest skyscraper in the country. But a banking crisis brought those plans to an abrupt halt in 1994. The government took control over the building and construction was never completed. The building has no elevators, no installed electricity or running water, no balcony railing and windows and even walls in many places.
In 2007, a group of squatters took over the building, and it quickly gained notoriety as a hotbed of crime and drugs. Despite this, residents have managed to build a comfortable and self sustaining community complete with basic utility services such as electricity and water that reaches all the way up to the 22nd floor. Lifts being absent, residents can use motorcycles to travel up and down the first 10 floors, but must use the stairs for the remaining levels.  Inside the building’s long hallways there are warehouses, clothing stores, beauty parlours, a dentist and day-care centers. Some residents even have cars, parked inside of the building’s parking garage. Some seven hundred families comprising over 3,000 residents live in the tower today.
ryanpanos:

Tower of David: the World’s Tallest Slum | Via
The Tower of David is an abandoned unfinished skyscraper in the center of Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela, that is now home to more than 3,000 squatters, who have turned the 45-story skyscraper into the world’s tallest slum.
Construction of the building, originally called “Centro Financiero Confinanzas” and nicknamed the “Tower of David”, after its developer, David Brillembourg, was started in 1990 and was to become a symbol of Caracas’ bright financial future. It is the third highest skyscraper in the country. But a banking crisis brought those plans to an abrupt halt in 1994. The government took control over the building and construction was never completed. The building has no elevators, no installed electricity or running water, no balcony railing and windows and even walls in many places.
In 2007, a group of squatters took over the building, and it quickly gained notoriety as a hotbed of crime and drugs. Despite this, residents have managed to build a comfortable and self sustaining community complete with basic utility services such as electricity and water that reaches all the way up to the 22nd floor. Lifts being absent, residents can use motorcycles to travel up and down the first 10 floors, but must use the stairs for the remaining levels.  Inside the building’s long hallways there are warehouses, clothing stores, beauty parlours, a dentist and day-care centers. Some residents even have cars, parked inside of the building’s parking garage. Some seven hundred families comprising over 3,000 residents live in the tower today.
ryanpanos:

Tower of David: the World’s Tallest Slum | Via
The Tower of David is an abandoned unfinished skyscraper in the center of Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela, that is now home to more than 3,000 squatters, who have turned the 45-story skyscraper into the world’s tallest slum.
Construction of the building, originally called “Centro Financiero Confinanzas” and nicknamed the “Tower of David”, after its developer, David Brillembourg, was started in 1990 and was to become a symbol of Caracas’ bright financial future. It is the third highest skyscraper in the country. But a banking crisis brought those plans to an abrupt halt in 1994. The government took control over the building and construction was never completed. The building has no elevators, no installed electricity or running water, no balcony railing and windows and even walls in many places.
In 2007, a group of squatters took over the building, and it quickly gained notoriety as a hotbed of crime and drugs. Despite this, residents have managed to build a comfortable and self sustaining community complete with basic utility services such as electricity and water that reaches all the way up to the 22nd floor. Lifts being absent, residents can use motorcycles to travel up and down the first 10 floors, but must use the stairs for the remaining levels.  Inside the building’s long hallways there are warehouses, clothing stores, beauty parlours, a dentist and day-care centers. Some residents even have cars, parked inside of the building’s parking garage. Some seven hundred families comprising over 3,000 residents live in the tower today.
ryanpanos:

Tower of David: the World’s Tallest Slum | Via
The Tower of David is an abandoned unfinished skyscraper in the center of Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela, that is now home to more than 3,000 squatters, who have turned the 45-story skyscraper into the world’s tallest slum.
Construction of the building, originally called “Centro Financiero Confinanzas” and nicknamed the “Tower of David”, after its developer, David Brillembourg, was started in 1990 and was to become a symbol of Caracas’ bright financial future. It is the third highest skyscraper in the country. But a banking crisis brought those plans to an abrupt halt in 1994. The government took control over the building and construction was never completed. The building has no elevators, no installed electricity or running water, no balcony railing and windows and even walls in many places.
In 2007, a group of squatters took over the building, and it quickly gained notoriety as a hotbed of crime and drugs. Despite this, residents have managed to build a comfortable and self sustaining community complete with basic utility services such as electricity and water that reaches all the way up to the 22nd floor. Lifts being absent, residents can use motorcycles to travel up and down the first 10 floors, but must use the stairs for the remaining levels.  Inside the building’s long hallways there are warehouses, clothing stores, beauty parlours, a dentist and day-care centers. Some residents even have cars, parked inside of the building’s parking garage. Some seven hundred families comprising over 3,000 residents live in the tower today.
ryanpanos:

Tower of David: the World’s Tallest Slum | Via
The Tower of David is an abandoned unfinished skyscraper in the center of Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela, that is now home to more than 3,000 squatters, who have turned the 45-story skyscraper into the world’s tallest slum.
Construction of the building, originally called “Centro Financiero Confinanzas” and nicknamed the “Tower of David”, after its developer, David Brillembourg, was started in 1990 and was to become a symbol of Caracas’ bright financial future. It is the third highest skyscraper in the country. But a banking crisis brought those plans to an abrupt halt in 1994. The government took control over the building and construction was never completed. The building has no elevators, no installed electricity or running water, no balcony railing and windows and even walls in many places.
In 2007, a group of squatters took over the building, and it quickly gained notoriety as a hotbed of crime and drugs. Despite this, residents have managed to build a comfortable and self sustaining community complete with basic utility services such as electricity and water that reaches all the way up to the 22nd floor. Lifts being absent, residents can use motorcycles to travel up and down the first 10 floors, but must use the stairs for the remaining levels.  Inside the building’s long hallways there are warehouses, clothing stores, beauty parlours, a dentist and day-care centers. Some residents even have cars, parked inside of the building’s parking garage. Some seven hundred families comprising over 3,000 residents live in the tower today.

ryanpanos:

Tower of David: the World’s Tallest Slum | Via

The Tower of David is an abandoned unfinished skyscraper in the center of Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela, that is now home to more than 3,000 squatters, who have turned the 45-story skyscraper into the world’s tallest slum.

Construction of the building, originally called “Centro Financiero Confinanzas” and nicknamed the “Tower of David”, after its developer, David Brillembourg, was started in 1990 and was to become a symbol of Caracas’ bright financial future. It is the third highest skyscraper in the country. But a banking crisis brought those plans to an abrupt halt in 1994. The government took control over the building and construction was never completed. The building has no elevators, no installed electricity or running water, no balcony railing and windows and even walls in many places.

In 2007, a group of squatters took over the building, and it quickly gained notoriety as a hotbed of crime and drugs. Despite this, residents have managed to build a comfortable and self sustaining community complete with basic utility services such as electricity and water that reaches all the way up to the 22nd floor. Lifts being absent, residents can use motorcycles to travel up and down the first 10 floors, but must use the stairs for the remaining levels.  Inside the building’s long hallways there are warehouses, clothing stores, beauty parlours, a dentist and day-care centers. Some residents even have cars, parked inside of the building’s parking garage. Some seven hundred families comprising over 3,000 residents live in the tower today.

(via thelittlestonedfox)

purpleasaniris:

dwnsy:

Frida Kahlo (1907.07.06-1954.07.13)

The Broken Column, c.1944

(via talldrinkowater)


To believe in a universe as young as six or seven thousand years old is to extinguish the light from most of the galaxy. Not to mention, the light from all the hundred billion other galaxies in the observable universe.

To believe in a universe as young as six or seven thousand years old is to extinguish the light from most of the galaxy. Not to mention, the light from all the hundred billion other galaxies in the observable universe.

To believe in a universe as young as six or seven thousand years old is to extinguish the light from most of the galaxy. Not to mention, the light from all the hundred billion other galaxies in the observable universe.

To believe in a universe as young as six or seven thousand years old is to extinguish the light from most of the galaxy. Not to mention, the light from all the hundred billion other galaxies in the observable universe.

To believe in a universe as young as six or seven thousand years old is to extinguish the light from most of the galaxy. Not to mention, the light from all the hundred billion other galaxies in the observable universe.

To believe in a universe as young as six or seven thousand years old is to extinguish the light from most of the galaxy. Not to mention, the light from all the hundred billion other galaxies in the observable universe.

To believe in a universe as young as six or seven thousand years old is to extinguish the light from most of the galaxy. Not to mention, the light from all the hundred billion other galaxies in the observable universe.

(via talldrinkowater)

sanchezita:

Tiny Cities Made of Ashes

(via metacrilato)